He said a unique feature of deportations from Latvia between 1940 and 1941 was that the Krasnoyarsk area of Siberia, to which many Latvians were deported, was "probably the most remote of the eastern settlement areas.". Just as Hitler was turning his guns towards the Soviet Union in June 1941, Soviet authorities ordered mass deportations in all three Baltic States. Baltic States commemorate 1941 Soviet deportations. "They violate international law, but the notion of genocide is improperly and historically undervalued if applied to this undoubtedly tragic, but at the same time typical page in Soviet and, unfortunately, Latvian history," said Polian. begin at noon at the monument to the victory in the War of Independence in A similar operation A march of deportation survivors will take place in the Latvian capital Riga at noon, and a commemoration will take place in Tallinn on Monday night when candles will be lit. Reinsalu and representatives of the association of illegally repressed Riigikogu, government, defense forces, Kaitseliit (Defense League), City of BC, Tallinn, 14.06.2016. deported on that day perished through cold, hard labor, hunger and diseases or affected by what happened in 1941 will be shown. "Every 50th Jew was deported, every 120th Latvian was deported.". There is no cooperation. or present-day Moldova, in Lithuania and in Latvia. is carried out at the statue of Linda in Tallinn but since it is the 75th Latvia and Lithuania also commemorate this date. A subscription to The Baltic Times is a cost-effective way of staying in touch with the latest Baltic news and views enabling you full access from anywhere with an Internet connection. begin at noon at the monument to the victory in the War of Independence in But some speakers warned against comparing Soviet deportations with the Holocaust. occupation authorities deported more than 10,000 people, of whom 80 percent They were then annexed into the Soviet Union as constituent republics in August 1940, though most Western powers and nations never recognised their incorporation. The Soviet occupation of the Baltic states covers the period from the Soviet–Baltic mutual assistance pacts in 1939, to their invasion and annexation in 1940, to the mass deportations of 1941. On the afternoon of June 12 the remains of an unknown soldier of the inter-war Latvian republic who was deported in 1941, were buried at the Brothers' Cemetery in Riga. Our news analysis and commentaries provide readers with insight essential to understanding the three Baltic countries and their neighbors. The statistics presented here today show that nothing could be further from the truth.". Memorial events to mark the 75th On June 14, 1941 the Soviet Tallinn. Read more... Our news analysis and commentaries provide readers with insight essential to understanding the three Baltic countries and their neighbors. Traditionally the June 14 ceremony were executed, including almost all of the 3,500 men separated from their RIGA - As Latvia prepared to honor the estimated 15,424 Latvian citizens deported by Soviet forces on June 14, 1941, President Vaira Vike-Freiberga said at a conference in Riga that the treatment of deportees amounted to genocide. While the victims may have been classed as "socially dangerous elements," the deportations were actually indiscriminate, she said - a claim backed by the Center for the Documentation of the Consequences of Totalitarianism - the state institution responsible for researching the subject. start tolling in Tallinn and white balloons for each of the around 10,000 Born of a merger between The Baltic Independent and The Baltic Observer in 1996, The Baltic Times continues to bring objective, comprehensive, and timely information to those with an interest in this rapidly developing area of the Baltic Sea region. Read more... Our news analysis and commentaries provide readers with insight essential to understanding the three Baltic countries and their neighbors. families and sent directly to prison camps. Steven Springfield, a Holocaust survivor and member of the historical commission established by Vike-Freiberga to study the Holocaust in Latvia, emphasized the same point in his speech. "There are laws against Holocaust denial, but there are people who try to deny Stalin's repressions. A subscription to The Baltic Times is a cost-effective way of staying in touch with the latest Baltic news and views enabling you full access from anywhere with an Internet connection. Nestor, Justice Minister Urmas Memorial events to mark the 75th And the Lithuanian Special Archives have created a virtual document exhibition which includes Soviet documents disclosing preparations of Soviet repressive structures for the deportation operation and its implementation, as well as documents and photos from deportees' cases. The Baltic Times is an independent monthly newspaper that covers latest political, economic, business, and cultural events in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. the memorial to terror victims at the Liiva cemetery. In conclusion, he said the Soviet deportations should be classed as crimes against humanity, but not as genocide. The Soviet occupation brought about an event that until then had only been read about in history books and which became the most horrible memory of the past centuries – mass deportations which affected people of all nationalities living in Estonia. Speaker of the parliament. "Latvians have long considered the deportations corresponded to genocide," said Vike-Freiberga. anniversary of the first Soviet-era mass deportation will be held across were women, children and old persons, from Estonia to Siberia. 2001-06-14 ; Nick Coleman; RIGA - As Latvia prepared to honor the estimated 15,424 Latvian citizens deported by Soviet forces on June 14, 1941, President Vaira Vike-Freiberga said at a conference in Riga that the treatment of deportees amounted to genocide. Square the names of the more than 12,000 repressed people who were directly Representatives of the president, the Born of a merger between The Baltic Independent and The Baltic Observer in 1996, The Baltic Times continues to bring objective, comprehensive, and timely information to those with an interest in this rapidly developing area of the Baltic Sea region. Around 6,000 of the Estonians Subscribe Now! The soldier's remains came from the Russian Far Eastern region of Norilsk, where hundreds of deported officers and several thousand Latvian troops died. With offices in Tallinn and Vilnius and its headquarters in Riga, The Baltic Times remains the only pan-Baltic English language newspaper offering complete coverage of regional events.Publisher: Gene ZolotarevEditor in chief: Linas JegeleviciusCulture editor: culture@baltictimes.comOnline editor: anna@baltictimes.com. But some speakers warned against comparing Soviet deportations with the Holocaust. Baltics mark Soviet deportations. ", She also said the second largest ethnic group victimized by the deportation were Jews, a point elaborated on by Indulis Zalite, director of the Center for the Documentation of the Consequences of Totalitarianism. 74. With offices in Tallinn and Vilnius and its headquarters in Riga, The Baltic Times remains the only pan-Baltic English language newspaper offering complete coverage of regional events.Publisher: Gene ZolotarevEditor in chief: Linas JegeleviciusCulture editor: culture@baltictimes.comOnline editor: anna@baltictimes.com. The occupation of the Baltic states involved the military occupation of the three Baltic states—Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania—by the Soviet Union under the auspices of the 1939 Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact in June 1940. As the Baltic states mark this painful date, the Museum of Occuptions and Freedom Fights, situated in the former KGB building, in Vilnius is providing free admissions on Monday. Opening the conference entitled "The Deportations of June 14, 1941: Crimes Against Humanity," at Latvia University on June 11, Vike-Freiberga called for the West to learn more about Soviet deportations. Speaker of the parliament Eiki With offices in Tallinn and Vilnius and its headquarters in Riga, The Baltic Times remains the only pan-Baltic English language newspaper offering complete coverage of regional events. According to Pavel Polian, of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, around 400,000 people were deported from the newly incorporated Western regions of the Soviet Union, including the Baltic states, western Belarus, western Ukraine and Moldova. The two deportations that affected Estonia the most, on 14 June 1941 and 25 March 1949, are annually observed as days of mourning. Estonia on Tuesday, with the national flag flown half-staff, informs, A memorial ceremony and service will